We are not designed to sit all day! Being active on a daily basis is one of the best things you can do for your health. The benefits of exercise, even just small amounts, are truly significant.

Time Magazine recently found that “only 20% of Americans get the recommended 150 minutes of strength and cardiovascular physical activity per week, more than half of all baby boomers report doing no exercise whatsoever, and 80.2 million Americans over age 6 are entirely inactive.”

 

EXERCISE IF GREAT FOR YOUR HEALTH!
Exercise well boost your mood, help you control your weight, give you energy, improve your memory and help you sleep.  Regular exercise may even lower your risk for heart decease, cancer, diabetes, and even Alzheimer’s decease.  So stop sitting around and get moving.  There is no doubt about that fact that our bodies are built to move, not to sit around all the time.

 

ADD MOVEMENT TO YOUR EVERY DAY!
Here are a few simple idea on to incorporate movement in your daily life without taking up too much time and still reaping the benefits.

  • Get some fresh air on the way to work! Walk or bike to work if your commute allows for that
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator
  • Use an exercise ball to sit on at work or a standing desk to take breaks from sitting for long periods of time
  • Park in the farthest spot and walk to the storefront or your office building
  • Take a “walk break” instead of a coffee break at work to rejuvenate your energy and boost creativity
  • Do you have 7 minutes to invest in potentially live saving choices? Try using a high intense interval training program that can give you the benefits of exercise in a small amount of time – such as the popular scientific “7-minute workout”.

 

ACTIVE PEOPLE ARE LESS LIKELTY TO DEVELOP HEART 
Remember that people who are sedentary have the highest rate of heart attack, that an hour of walking daily cut the risk of obesity by 24%, that less active and less fit people have a greater risk of developing high blood pressure and that studies show that physically active people are less likely to develop coronary heart disease than those who are inactive. This is even after researchers accounted for smoking, alcohol use, and diet.

Heart condition affects more that half of adults around the world.